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Product Manuals --part5

Star Tracking Mode Setup

Attention: 

  • For Star tracking, GAUDA rotator supports all cameras.  
  • There is no need to connect the Hot Shoe cable in star tracking mode.
  •  

    For detailed star tracking tutorial, please check our official website.

    https://www.moveshootmove.com/blogs/astrophotography-tutorial?aff=13

     

    Steps to set up for star tracking mode

    1. Install the pan/tilt head on to the tripod, install the Rotator on to the Pan/Tilt head.




    1. Attach the laser pointer mount onto the Rotator. Aim the laser pointer to the Polaris to do a draft polar alignment.

     

    1. Install the Ball head on to the Rotator.




    1. Install the Camera onto the Ball head.                                                                              
    2. Fine Polar Alignment, Power on the laser pointer and aim the laser pointer to the Polaris to do polar alignment again. (Due to we have put the camera onto the Rotator, more weight has changed the gesture of the setup )
      Attention, Please do not keep the laser pointer continuous running more than 1 min, this may shorten the life of the laser pointer.

    If you shoot in the southern hemisphere, please check the tutorial on our website. Or click below:

    https://www.moveshootmove.com/pages/polar-alignment-tutorial-for-southern-hemisphere-with-msm-sifo-star-tracker 

    1. Turn on GAUDA Rotator by hold and press the power button, then it will start tracking the moment you power it on.
    1. Choose the hemisphere of your shooting location. 

         N is for the Northern Hemisphere. 

         S is for the Southern Hemisphere.

    1. Then choose the speed you needed.
    • Full-speed is the standard star speed. 

     If you want to take Milky Way photos with foreground, you need to take 2 photos, one power on the rotator for the star, one power off the rotator for the foreground. This way all two photos are perfect with no trails.

    •  Half-speed is 1/2 of the star speed. This is suitable to take Milky Way photos with the foreground in one shot, this way the star trail and the foreground object just have little trails.